0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Letters to the Editor |

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Una D. McCann, MD; Timothy A. Kimbrell, MD; Christina M. Morgan; Todd Anderson; Marilla Geraci, RN, MSN; Brenda E. Benson; Eric M. Wassermann, MD; Mark W. Willis, MENG; Robert M. Post, MD
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998;55(3):276-279. doi:.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Several laboratories using functional neuroimaging techniques have recently reported that patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have increased blood flow or metabolism in right limbic, paralimbic, and frontal cortical structures when recalling the traumatic event associated with their symptoms.14 This observation is consistent with several studies implicating preferential right hemispheric involvement in the experience of unpleasant emotion.510 Taken together, these findings suggest that right limbic and paralimbic structures are intimately involved with the emotional symptoms associated with traumatic memories,11 and could potentially be the target of neurobiological treatment strategies.

Figures in this Article

Topics

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms before, during, and after a course of 1-Hz right frontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS) as determined by the modified Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale. Values represent the mean score of all 17 items in the scale, collected at the end of each week of the study. Data were analyzed by 2 separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs). One ANOVA included data points from baseline ratings and the treatment period; the second included data points from baseline ratings and the recovery period. Paired t tests with Bonferroni corrections were performed between baseline scores and weekly treatment scores when appropriate. Asterisk indicates significant difference from baseline at a level of P=.05; dagger, significant difference from baseline at a level of P<.01; and double dagger, significant difference from baseline at a level of P<.001.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.

Regional glucose metabolic rates in brain regions at various levels relative to an age- and sex-matched control group (rows 1 and 2) and corresponding absolute decreases in glucose metabolic rates (row 3) seen after 1-Hz right frontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS).

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();