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Art and Images in Psychiatry |

The Red Book: Liber Novus

James C. Harris, MD
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010;67(6):554-556. doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.68.
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In the fall of 1913, 38-year-old Carl Jung (1875-1961) faced a personal midlife crisis just months before the onset of the First World War. It resulted in him abandoning his promising academic career at the university in Zurich, Switzerland, and his leadership in the psychoanalytic movement. Four years earlier, he had received international recognition when he, Sigmund Freud, and Adolf Meyer accepted honorary degrees from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.2 On his return to Switzerland in 1909, Jung built a new home for his growing family on Lake Zurich and resigned his hospital appointment to focus his attention on psychoanalysis, assuming the editorship of the Yearbook of Psychoanalysis and in 1910 the presidency of the newly formed International Psychoanalytic Association (IPA).

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Carl Jung (1875-1961), Swiss. Philemon. Image reprinted from The Red Book (p 154) by C. G. Jung. © The Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung. With permission of the publisher, WW Norton & Company, Inc, New York, New York.

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Figure 1

Carl Jung (1875-1961), Swiss. Tree of Life. Image reprinted from The Red Book (p 131) by C. G. Jung. © The Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung. With permission of the publisher, WW Norton & Company, Inc, New York, New York.

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Carl Jung (1875-1961), Swiss. World Egg. Image reprinted from The Red Book (p 135) by C. G. Jung. © The Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung. With permission of the publisher, WW Norton & Company, Inc, New York, New York.

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Figure 3

Carl Jung (1875-1961), Swiss. Window on Eternity. Image reprinted from The Red Book (p 159) by C. G. Jung. © The Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung. With permission of the publisher, WW Norton & Company, Inc, New York, New York.

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Submit a Comment
Affect in Dreams The Red Book and Sleep Laboratory
Posted on October 6, 2010
Milton Kramer, MD
University of Illinois ,Psychiatry,
Conflict of Interest: None Declared
Dear Editor:

Dr. Harris in his brief essay on the remarkable and illuminating work by C.J Jung, The Red Book: “Liber Novus", documenting Jung's extraordinary experience with his transforming dreams notes that his views of dreams are sophisticated and confirmed by recent studies of the importance of dreaming in affect regulation. This is indeed the case but the publication of the first theory embodying the affect regulating function of sleep and dreams utilizing sleep laboratory collections of dreams was first published in 1973 [Kramer, M. and Roth, T. The mood-regulating function of sleep. In: W.Koellea and P.Levin [Eds.] "Sleep-1972", Basel: Karger, p.536- 541] and most recently updated in "The Sleep Experience "New York:Routledge, 2007p-167-187. The expansion of Jung's insight was incorporated early into studies of laboratory dreaming and continues to this day.
Milton Kramer, M.D. Clinical Professor of Psychiatry University of Illinois at Chicago

Conflict of Interest: None declared
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