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Comment & Response |

Notice of Retraction and Replacement. Lopes et al. Gamma ventral capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(9):1066-1076 FREE

Antonio C. Lopes, MD, PhD1; Benjamin D. Greenberg, MD, PhD2,3; Carlos A. B. Pereira, PhD4; Georg Norén, MD, PhD2,3; Euripedes C. Miguel, MD, PhD1
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo (USP) School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil
2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
3Department of Neurosurgery, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
4Statistics Department of the Mathematics and Statistics Institute of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(12):1258. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.0673.
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Published online

In Reply On behalf of our coauthors, we are grateful to Dr Baethge for his detailed reading of our study. He is correct that for the primary outcome, we inadvertently misclassified a patient (ATa3) as a responder when indeed that patient was a nonresponder. When preparing the table, we inadvertently included in our computation of treatment response a Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score of 36 (the patient’s first measure) instead of 30 (the second measure). We defined the baseline Y-BOCS score for this study as the last value obtained before surgery. At that point, all patients knew they would receive the procedure.

Thus, instead of 3 of 8 patients responding in the treatment group at 12 months, 2 of 8 responded compared with 0 of 8 in the control group. Because of this error, the analysis has been redone and we have requested that JAMA Psychiatry retract and replace the original article.

In the corrected article,1 corrections have been made to the Abstract; Results, Discussion, and Conclusions sections of the text; Tables 2 and 3; Figure 2; and eFigure 3 and eTables 5, 6, and 7 in the Supplement. The article now concludes, “In this preliminary trial, patients with intractable OCD [obsessive-compulsive disorder] who underwent GVC [gamma ventral capsulotomy] may have benefitted more than those who underwent sham surgery although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Additional research is necessary to determine if GVC is better than deep-brain stimulation.”

We regret the errors caused by this misclassification as well as the confusion it caused for JAMA Psychiatry, readers, and potentially patients.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Corresponding Author: Antonio C. Lopes, MD, PhD, OCD Clinic (PROTOC), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, R. Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, 3° andar, sala 9, São Paulo, SP, 01060-970, Brazil (antonioclopesmd@gmail.com).

Published Online: October 28, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.0673.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

REFERENCES

Lopes  AC, Greenberg  BD, Canteras  MM,  et al.  Gamma ventral capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(9):1066-1076.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

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Tables

References

Lopes  AC, Greenberg  BD, Canteras  MM,  et al.  Gamma ventral capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(9):1066-1076.
PubMed   |  Link to Article

Correspondence

December 1, 2015
Stephan Heckers, MD; Howard Bauchner, MD; Annette Flanagin, RN, MA
1JAMA Psychiatry, Nashville, Tennessee
2JAMA and The JAMA Network, Chicago, Illinois
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(12):1170-1171. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.2278.
December 1, 2015
Christopher Baethge, MD
1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne Medical School, Cologne, Germany
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(12):1257-1258. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.0667.
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