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Comment & Response |

Errors in Identification of 17 of 527 Brain Images in Genetic Study of Phenotypes Associated With Bipolar Disorder

Scott C. Fears, MD, PhD1; Nelson B. Freimer, MD1; Carrie E. Bearden, PhD1,2,3
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
2Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles
3Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(7):758-759. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1051.
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To the Editor In the article titled “Multisystem Component Phenotypes of Bipolar Disorder for Genetic Investigations of Extended Pedigrees,”1 published online in JAMA Psychiatry on February 12, 2014, and in the April 2014 issue of the journal, results for the heritability and bipolar I disorder (BP-I) association analysis were reported for neuroimaging phenotypes acquired from a sample of 527 individuals from families with heavy genetic loading for BP-I. After publication, we discovered that 17 brain images had been assigned incorrect identifications. During ongoing analysis of the phenotype data acquired in this study, it was discovered that 2 magnetic resonance images of the brains from 1 of the 2 data acquisition sites (Colombia) were duplicated and assigned to more than 1 individual. This error affected 3 of the 527 images. Based on this discovery, we conducted a comprehensive review of all imaging data, in which we found that at the time of acquisition 14 images had been assigned to incorrect individuals. Thus, in total, 17 of 527 magnetic resonance images were affected by the errors.

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April 1, 2014
Scott C. Fears, MD, PhD; Susan K. Service, MS; Barbara Kremeyer, PhD; Carmen Araya, Lic; Xinia Araya, Lic; Julio Bejarano, MS; Margarita Ramirez, Lic; Gabriel Castrillón, BSc; Juliana Gomez-Franco, MD; Maria C. Lopez, MSW; Gabriel Montoya, MD, MSc; Patricia Montoya, MA; Ileana Aldana, MPH; Terri M. Teshiba, BA; Zvart Abaryan, BSc; Noor B. Al-Sharif, BSc; Marissa Ericson, PhD; Maria Jalbrzikowski, PhD; Jurjen J. Luykx, MD, PhD; Linda Navarro, MS; Todd A. Tishler, PhD; Lori Altshuler, MD; George Bartzokis, MD; Javier Escobar, MD; David C. Glahn, PhD; Jorge Ospina-Duque, MD; Neil Risch, PhD; Andrés Ruiz-Linares, MD, PhD; Paul M. Thompson, PhD; Rita M. Cantor, PhD; Carlos Lopez-Jaramillo, MD, PhD; Gabriel Macaya, PhD; Julio Molina, MD; Victor I. Reus, MD; Chiara Sabatti, PhD; Nelson B. Freimer, MD; Carrie E. Bearden, PhD
1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
2Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, England
3Cell and Molecular Biology Research, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, Costa Rica
4Instituto de Alta Tecnología Médica de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
5Grupo de Investigación en Psiquiatría, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles6Department of Psychiatry, ZNA Stuivenberg, Antwerp, Belgium
7Department of Psychiatry and Family Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick
8Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut9Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut
10Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco
11Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London, London, England
5Grupo de Investigación en Psiquiatría, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia12Mood Disorders Program, Hospital San Vicente Fundacion, Medellín, Colombia
1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles13BioCiencias Lab, Guatemala, Guatemala
14Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco
15Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University, Stanford, California
JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(4):375-387. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4100.
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