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Original Investigation |

Antipsychotic Use in Pregnancy and the Risk for Congenital Malformations

Krista F. Huybrechts, MS, PhD1; Sonia Hernández-Díaz, MD, DrPH2; Elisabetta Patorno, MD, DrPH1; Rishi J. Desai, PhD1; Helen Mogun, MS1; Sara Z. Dejene, BS1; Jacqueline M. Cohen, PhD2; Alice Panchaud, PhD2; Lee Cohen, MD3; Brian T. Bateman, MD, MSc1,4
[+] Author Affiliations
1Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
2Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
3Center for Women’s Mental Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
4Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(9):938-946. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1520.
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Importance  The frequency of antipsychotic (AP) use during pregnancy has approximately doubled during the last decade. However, little is known about their safety for the developing fetus, and concerns have been raised about a potential association with congenital malformations.

Objective  To examine the risk for congenital malformations overall and cardiac malformations associated with first-trimester exposure to APs.

Design, Setting, and Participants  This nationwide sample of 1 360 101 pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid with a live-born infant constituted the pregnancy cohort nested in the Medicaid Analytic Extract database, which included data from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. Participants were enrolled in Medicaid from 3 months before their last menstrual period through at least 1 month after delivery. Relative risks (RRs) were estimated using generalized linear models with fine stratification on the propensity score to control for the underlying psychiatric disorders and other potential confounders. Data were analyzed during 2015.

Exposures  Use of APs during the first trimester, the etiologically relevant period for organogenesis.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Major congenital malformations overall and cardiac malformations identified during the first 90 days after delivery.

Results  Of the 1 341 715 pregnancies that met inclusion criteria (mean [SD] age of women, 24.02 [5.77] years), 9258 (0.69%) filled at least 1 prescription for an atypical AP and 733 (0.05%) filled at least 1 prescription for a typical AP during the first trimester. Overall, 32.7 (95% CI, 32.4-33.0) per 1000 births not exposed to APs were diagnosed with congenital malformations compared with 44.5 (95% CI, 40.5-48.9) per 1000 births exposed to atypical and 38.2 (95% CI, 26.6-54.7) per 1000 births exposed to typical APs. Unadjusted analyses suggested an increased risk for malformations overall for atypical APs (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.24-1.50) but not for typical APs (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.81-1.68). After confounding adjustment, the RR was reduced to 1.05 (95% CI, 0.96-1.16) for atypical APs and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.62-1.31) for typical APs. The findings for cardiac malformations were similar. For the individual agents examined, a small increased risk in overall malformations (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.02-1.56) and cardiac malformations (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.88-1.81) was found for risperidone that was independent of measured confounders.

Conclusions and Relevance  Evidence from this large study suggests that use of APs early in pregnancy generally does not meaningfully increase the risk for congenital malformations overall or cardiac malformations in particular. The small increase in the risk for malformations observed with risperidone requires additional study.

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Figure 1.
Relative Risk (RR) for Congenital Malformations in Infants According to Maternal Exposure to Antipsychotics (APs)

The graph shows the results for the unadjusted analyses, analyses adjusted for psychiatric indications, and analyses adjusted for all potential confounders by exposure groups using Medicaid data from 2000 to 2010.

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Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.
Relative Risk (RR) for Cardiac Malformations in Infants According to Maternal Exposure to Antipsychotics (APs)

The graph shows the results for the unadjusted analyses, analyses adjusted for psychiatric indications, and analyses adjusted for all potential confounders by exposure groups using Medicaid data from 2000 to 2010.

Graphic Jump Location

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