0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......


Basic View | Expanded View
 Showing 1-20 of 26 Articles
Editorial 
Jim van Os, MD, PhD
Zavos and colleagues1 present a twin study showing that individual psychotic experiences (PE) (eg, paranoia, hallucinations, and grandiosity) in the general population display heritabilities that lie between those of depression (40%) and schizophrenia (60%). More important, the same genetic and environmental influences appear to drive variation across the spectrum of ...
Editorial 
Richard S. E. Keefe, PhD
In this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, Fervaha and colleagues1 use the publicly available database derived from 1331 patients with cognitive data in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia trial to explore the relationship between cognitive impairment and behaviors referred to as “amotivational.” The authors report correlations of ...
Original Investigation 
Helena M. S. Zavos, PhD; Daniel Freeman, PhD, DClinPsy; Claire M. A. Haworth, PhD; Philip McGuire, PhD, FRCPsych; Robert Plomin, PhD; Alastair G. Cardno, PhD, MRCPsych; Angelica Ronald, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  The onset of psychosis is usually preceded by psychotic experiences (PE). Little is known about the etiology of PE and whether the degree of genetic and environmental influences varies across different levels of severity. A recognized challenge is to identify individuals at high risk of developing ...

Original Investigation 
Gagan Fervaha, BSc; Konstantine K. Zakzanis, PhD; George Foussias, MD, PhD; Ariel Graff-Guerrero, MD, PhD; Ofer Agid, MD; Gary Remington, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Motivational and cognitive deficits are core features of schizophrenia, both closely linked with functional outcomes. Although poor effort and decreased motivation are known to affect performance on cognitive tests, the extent of this relationship is unclear in patients with schizophrenia.

Objective  To evaluate the association ...

Original Investigation 
John R. Blosnich, PhD, MPH; Melissa E. Dichter, PhD, MSW; Catherine Cerulli, PhD, JD; Sonja V. Batten, PhD; Robert M. Bossarte, PhD

Importance  Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with several adulthood health problems, such as self-directed violence. For some individuals, enlistment in the military may be an instrumental act to escape adverse household environments; however, to our knowledge prevalence of ACEs among persons with a history of military ...

Original Investigation 
Antonio C. Lopes, MD, PhD; Benjamin D. Greenberg, MD, PhD; Miguel M. Canteras, MD; Marcelo C. Batistuzzo, PsyD; Marcelo Q. Hoexter, MD, PhD; André F. Gentil, MD; Carlos A. B. Pereira, PhD; Marinês A. Joaquim, RN; Maria E. de Mathis, PsyD; Carina C. D’Alcante, PsyD, MSc; Anita Taub, PsyD, MSc; Douglas G. de Castro, MD; Lucas Tokeshi, MD; Leonardo A. N. P. C. Sampaio, MD; Cláudia C. Leite, MD, PhD; Roseli G. Shavitt, MD, PhD; Juliana B. Diniz, MD, PhD; Geraldo Busatto, MD, PhD; Georg Norén, MD, PhD; Steven A. Rasmussen, MD, PhD; Eurípedes C. Miguel, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Select cases of intractable obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have undergone neurosurgical ablation for more than half a century. However, to our knowledge, there have been no randomized clinical trials of such procedures for the treatment of any psychiatric disorder.

Objective  To determine the efficacy and safety ...

Original Investigation 
David M. Fergusson, PhD; L. John Horwood, MSc; Joseph M. Boden, PhD; Roger T. Mulder, MB, ChB, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  There has been growing research into the mental health consequences of major disasters. Few studies have controlled for prospectively assessed mental health. This article describes a natural experiment in which 57% of a well-studied birth cohort was exposed to a major natural disaster (the Canterbury, New ...

Original Investigation 
Emmanuel Lagarde, PhD; Louis-Rachid Salmi, MD, PhD; Lena W. Holm, DrMedSc; Benjamin Contrand, MPH; Françoise Masson, MD; Régis Ribéreau-Gayon, MD; Magali Laborey, PhD; J. David Cassidy, PhD, DrMedSc
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  A proportion of patients experience long-lasting symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). The postconcussion syndrome (PCS), included in the DSM-IV, has been proposed to describe this condition. Because these symptoms are subjective and common to other conditions, there is controversy whether PCS deserves to ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Lee M. Hampton, MD, MSc; Matthew Daubresse, MHS; Hsien-Yen Chang, PhD; G. Caleb Alexander, MD, MS; Daniel S. Budnitz, MD, MPH
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  In 2011, an estimated 26.8 million US adults used prescription medications for mental illness.

Objective  To estimate the numbers and rates of adverse drug event (ADE) emergency department (ED) visits involving psychiatric medications among US adults between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2011.

Design ...

Original Investigation 
Sarah L. Karalunas, PhD; Damien Fair, PhD; Erica D. Musser, PhD; Kamari Aykes, BS; Swathi P. Iyer, MS; Joel T. Nigg, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Psychiatric nosology is limited by behavioral and biological heterogeneity within existing disorder categories. The imprecise nature of current nosologic distinctions limits both mechanistic understanding and clinical prediction. We demonstrate an approach consistent with the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria initiative to identify superior, ...

Original Investigation 
Benjamin B. Lahey, PhD; David H. Zald, PhD; Jahn K. Hakes, PhD; Robert F. Krueger, PhD; Paul J. Rathouz, PhD

Importance  Mental disorders predict future occurrences of both the same disorder (homotypic continuity) and other disorders (heterotypic continuity). Heterotypic continuity is inconsistent with a view of mental disorders as fixed entities. In contrast, hierarchical-dimensional conceptualizations of psychopathology, in which each form of psychopathology is hypothesized to have ...

Original Investigation 
W. Curt LaFrance Jr, MD, MPH; Grayson L. Baird, MS; John J. Barry, MD; Andrew S. Blum, MD, PhD; Anne Frank Webb, MA; Gabor I. Keitner, MD; Jason T. Machan, PhD; Ivan Miller, PhD; Jerzy P. Szaflarski, MD, PhD; for the NES Treatment Trial (NEST-T) Consortium
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  There is a paucity of controlled treatment trials for the treatment of conversion disorder, seizures type, also known as psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, the most common conversion disorder, are as disabling as epilepsy and are not adequately addressed or treated by mental health ...

Original Investigation 
Therese Ljung, PhD; Qi Chen, MSc; Paul Lichtenstein, PhD; Henrik Larsson, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  The prevention of suicidal behavior is one of the most important tasks for mental health clinicians. Although a few studies have indicated an increased risk of suicidal behavior among individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the development of more effective ways of identifying and modifying the risk is ...

Original Investigation 
Rosa Alati, PhD, MApplSc; Kim S. Betts, MPH; Gail M. Williams, PhD, MSc; Jacob M. Najman, PhD; Wayne D. Hall, PhD

Importance  Increases in alcohol use in young women over recent decades are shown by national survey data but have yet to be replicated using prospective data.

Objective  To compare change in alcohol use over a generation of young women born in Australia from 1981 to 1983 ...

Original Investigation 
Thomas J. Hoffmann, PhD; Gayle C. Windham, PhD; Meredith Anderson, MA; Lisa A. Croen, PhD; Judith K. Grether, PhD; Neil Risch, PhD

Importance  Few studies have examined the curtailment of reproduction (ie, stoppage) after the diagnosis of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Objective  To examine stoppage in a large, population-based cohort of families in which a child has received a diagnosis of ASD.

Design, Setting, and ...

Original Investigation 
Kristen Lyall, ScD; John N. Constantino, MD; Marc G. Weisskopf, PhD, ScD; Andrea L. Roberts, PhD; Alberto Ascherio, MD, DrPH; Susan L. Santangelo, ScD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is known to be heritable, patterns of inheritance of subclinical autistic traits in nonclinical samples are poorly understood.

Objective  To examine the familiality of Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) scores of individuals with and without ASD.

Design, Setting, and Participants  ...

Original Investigation 
Ezra Wegbreit, PhD; Grace K. Cushman, BS; Megan E. Puzia, BA; Alexandra B. Weissman, BA; Kerri L. Kim, PhD; Angela R. Laird, PhD; Daniel P. Dickstein, MD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating mental illness associated with high costs to diagnosed individuals and society. Within the past 2 decades, increasing numbers of children and adolescents have been diagnosed as having BD. While functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have begun to investigate the ...

Editorial 
Sonia J. Lupien, PhD
Three individuals with a substance use disorder enter an inpatient 12-step program in a community mental health center and for the first month of the program, all 3 individuals are abstinent. They are then discharged from inpatient treatment and return for face-to-face follow-up interviews at 14, 30, and 90 days ...
Original Investigation 
Kimberly Ann Yonkers, MD; Megan V. Smith, DrPh; Ariadna Forray, MD; C. Neill Epperson, MD; Darce Costello, EdD; Haiqun Lin, PhD, MD; Kathleen Belanger, PhD†
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in about 8% of pregnant women. Stressful conditions, including PTSD, are inconsistently linked to preterm birth. Psychotropic treatment has been frequently associated with preterm birth. Identifying whether the psychiatric illness or its treatment is independently associated with preterm birth may help ...

Original Investigation 
Monika A. Waszczuk, MSc; Helena M. S. Zavos, PhD; Alice M. Gregory, PhD; Thalia C. Eley, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  The DSM-5 classifies mood and anxiety disorders as separate conditions. However, some studies in adults find a unidimensional internalizing factor that underpins anxiety and depression, while others support a bidimensional model where symptoms segregate into distress (depression and generalized anxiety) and fear factors (phobia subscales). However, ...

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Subscribe to the journal