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Basic View | Expanded View
 Showing 1-20 of 33 Articles

This Viewpoint discusses developing a risk-prediction framework in psychiatric practice.

Viewpoint 
Daniel S. Pine, MD; Ellen Leibenluft, MD

It is well acknowledged that a major problem facing psychiatric research is the greater complexity of the brain and psychiatric illness compared with organs and diseases that are the focus of other medical specialties. Nonetheless, psychiatry might achieve a needed paradigm shift by more closely aligning its research ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Huaiqiang Sun, PhD; Su Lui, MD, PhD; Li Yao, MS; Wei Deng, MD; Yuan Xiao, MS; Wenjing Zhang, MS; Xiaoqi Huang, MD, PhD; Junmei Hu, MD; Feng Bi, MD, PhD; Tao Li, MD, PhD; John A. Sweeney, PhD; Qiyong Gong, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that cerebral white matter abnormalities are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; however, findings from in vivo neuroimaging studies have been inconsistent. Besides confounding factors, including age, illness duration, and medication effects, an additional cause for the inconsistent results may be ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Genetics of Personality Consortium
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Neuroticism is a pervasive risk factor for psychiatric conditions. It genetically overlaps with major depressive disorder (MDD) and is therefore an important phenotype for psychiatric genetics. The Genetics of Personality Consortium has created a resource for genome-wide association analyses of personality traits in more than 63 000 ...

Original Investigation 
Erik Andersson, PhD; Erik Hedman, PhD; Jesper Enander, MSc; Diana Radu Djurfeldt, MD, PhD; Brjánn Ljótsson, PhD; Simon Cervenka, MD, PhD; Josef Isung, MD; Cecilia Svanborg, MD, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Viktor Kaldo, PhD; Gerhard Andersson, PhD; Nils Lindefors, MD, PhD; Christian Rück, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  It is unclear whether d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-d-aspartate agonist that enhances fear extinction, can augment the effects of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Objectives  To examine whether DCS augments the effects of CBT for OCD and ...

Research Letter 
Lot D. de Witte, MD, PhD; Carolin Hoffmann, MSc; Hans C. van Mierlo, MD; Maarten J. Titulaer, MD, PhD; René S. Kahn, MD, PhD; Pilar Martinez-Martinez, PhD; for the European Consortium of Autoimmune Mental Disorders (CAIMED)

This research letter investigates the presence of anti-GluN1 IgG autoantibodies in 475 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder and includes the cross-validation of positive samples.

Original Investigation 
Maria M. Rive, MD; Roel J. T. Mocking, MSc; Maarten W. J. Koeter, PhD; Guido van Wingen, PhD; Stella J. de Wit, MD; Odile A. van den Heuvel, MD, PhD; Dick J. Veltman, MD, PhD; Henricus G. Ruhé, MD, PhD; Aart H. Schene, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are difficult to distinguish clinically during the depressed or remitted states. Both mood disorders are characterized by emotion regulation disturbances; however, little is known about emotion regulation differences between MDD and BD. Better insight into these differences would ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Jean-Baptiste Pingault, PhD; Essi Viding, PhD; Cédric Galéra, MD, PhD; Corina U. Greven, PhD; Yao Zheng, PhD; Robert Plomin, PhD; Frühling Rijsdijk, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder that is strongly heritable. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has examined the genetic and environmental influences explaining interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptoms from childhood to adolescence (ie, systematic decreases or ...

Comment & Response 
Alexander C. Tsai, MD, PhD; Atheendar S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD

To the Editor Mundt et al1 should be applauded for attempting to bring new data to bear on a research question of substantive policy significance. However, we are concerned that their analysis overlooked a point of critical significance. While they argued that their findings “cannot be explained ...

Comment & Response 
Adrian P. Mundt, MD; Winnie S. Chow, MSc; Stefan Priebe, FRCPsych

In Reply We thank Tsai and Venkataramani for their comments, which raise important methodological issues and challenge the findings presented in our article.1 They reconstructed the data set and stated that the association found between psychiatric bed numbers and prison populations disappears once they adjusted for year ...

Original Investigation 
Erik O’Hanlon, PhD; Alexander Leemans, PhD; Ian Kelleher, MD, PhD; Mary C. Clarke, PhD; Sarah Roddy, PhD; Helen Coughlan, BSS, MPhil; Michelle Harley, MD; Francesco Amico, PhD; Matthew J. Hoscheit, BSc; Lauren Tiedt, MD; Javeria Tabish, MD; Anna McGettigan, MD; Thomas Frodl, MD, MA; Mary Cannon, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Abnormal brain connectivity is thought to have a key role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. White matter (WM) abnormalities have been reported in patients with schizophrenia and patients with prodromal syndromes. To our knowledge, no studies have yet reported on WM differences ...

Invited Commentary 
Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas, MA, MD, PhD; Ricardo Torres-Jardón, PhD

This Viewpoint discusses the effect of air pollutants on the brain and the benefits of environmental regulations and compliance and enforcement actions.

Comment & Response 
Giovanni A. Fava, MD; Richard Balon, MD; Karl Rickels, MD

To the Editor In their Editorial, Moore and colleagues1 questioned the clinical usefulness of benzodiazepines, emphasized their addicting potential, and questioned why they are not controlled substances, such as barbiturates and opioids. However, their opinions run counter to the evidence that is available.

Comment & Response 
John H. Krystal, MD; Scott Stossel, BA; Andrew D. Krystal, MD

To the Editor In their Editorial, Moore et al1 presented as a foregone conclusion, unsupported by reference to the published literature, that benzodiazepines rapidly lose their efficacy as hypnotics and anxiolytics, while being associated with growing risks over time. From this perspective, long-term prescription of these drugs ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Craig Rodriguez-Seijas, BSc; Malki Stohl, MS; Deborah S. Hasin, PhD; Nicholas R. Eaton, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Multivariable comorbidity research indicates that many common mental disorders are manifestations of 2 latent transdiagnostic factors, internalizing and externalizing. Environmental stressors are known to increase the risk for experiencing particular mental disorders, but their relationships with transdiagnostic disorder constructs are unknown. The present study investigated one ...

Research Letter 
Matthew J. Kempton, MSc, PhD; Ilaria Bonoldi, MD; Lucia Valmaggia, PhD; Philip McGuire, MBChB, MD, PhD, FRCPsych, FMedSci; Paolo Fusar-Poli, MD, PhD, RCPsych

This meta-analysis discusses the speed of psychosis progression in patients at ultra-high risk.

Original Investigation 
Frances R. Levin, MD; John J. Mariani, MD; Sheila Specker, MD; Marc Mooney, PhD; Amy Mahony, LMHC; Daniel J. Brooks, MA; David Babb, BA; Yun Bai, MS; Lynn E. Eberly, PhD; Edward V. Nunes, MD; John Grabowski, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is prevalent but often unrecognized, in part because it tends to co-occur with other disorders such as substance use disorders. Cocaine use disorder is one such disorder with high co-occurrence of ADHD.

Objective  To examine whether treatment of co-occurring ADHD and ...

Original Investigation  FREE
Wayne Katon, MD†; Henrik Sondergaard Pedersen, MSc; Anette Riisgaard Ribe, MD; Morten Fenger-Grøn, MSc; Dimitry Davydow, MD, MPH; Frans Boch Waldorff, MD, PhD; Mogens Vestergaard, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Although depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may independently increase the risk for dementia, no studies have examined whether the risk for dementia among people with comorbid depression and DM is higher than the sum of each exposure individually.

Objective  To examine the risk ...

Invited Commentary: Healthy Brain Aging; Charles F. Reynolds III, MD
Invited Commentary 
Charles F. Reynolds III, MD

The co-occurrence of diabetes mellitus and depression, especially in persons younger than 65 years, poses an important hazard to healthy brain aging and cognitive fitness in the later years of life. Katon and colleagues1 from Denmark contribute this key observation in this issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

Viewpoint 
Andrew H. Miller, MD; Charles L. Raison, MD

This Viewpoint reports on the accumulating data indicating that inflammation may play a role in a host of psychiatric illnesses.

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