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 Showing 1-20 of 36 Articles
Original Investigation  FREE
Robert J. Ursano, MD; Ronald C. Kessler, PhD; Murray B. Stein, MD, MPH; James A. Naifeh, PhD; Pablo A. Aliaga, MS; Carol S. Fullerton, PhD; Gary H. Wynn, MD; Patti L. Vegella, MS, MA; Tsz Hin Hinz Ng, MPH; Bailey G. Zhang, MS; Christina L. Wryter, BA; Nancy A. Sampson, BA; Tzu-Cheg Kao, PhD; Lisa J. Colpe, PhD, MPH; Michael Schoenbaum, PhD; James E. McCarroll, PhD, MPH; Kenneth L. Cox, MD, MPH; Steven G. Heeringa, PhD; for the Army STARRS Collaborators
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Suicide attempts in the US Army have risen in the past decade. Understanding the association between suicide attempts and deployment, as well as method and timing of suicide attempts, can assist in developing interventions.

Objective  To examine suicide attempt risk factors, methods, and timing among ...

Special Communication 
Charles W. Hoge, MD; Rachel Yehuda, PhD; Carl A. Castro, PhD; Alexander C. McFarlane, MD; Eric Vermetten, MD, PhD; Rakesh Jetly, MD; Karestan C. Koenen, PhD; Neil Greenberg, MD; Arieh Y. Shalev, MD; Sheila A. M. Rauch, PhD; Charles R. Marmar, MD; Barbara O. Rothbaum, PhD

This Special Communication argues against changing the definition of posttraumatic stress disorder in DSM-5.

Special Communication 
Matthew J. Friedman, MD, PhD; Dean G. Kilpatrick, PhD; Paula P. Schnurr, PhD; Frank W. Weathers, PhD

This Special Communication argues for changing the definition of posttraumatic stress disorder in DSM-5.

Editorial 
Stephen V. Faraone, PhD; Joseph Biederman, MD

In this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, 2 large, longitudinal, population studies from Brazil1 and the United Kingdom2 propose a paradigmatic shift in our understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They conclude, not only that the onset of ADHD can occur in adulthood, but that childhood-onset and ...

Original Investigation 
Arthur Caye; Thiago Botter-Maio Rocha, MD, MSc; Luciana Anselmi, PhD; Joseph Murray, PhD; Ana M. B. Menezes, PhD; Fernando C. Barros, PhD; Helen Gonçalves, PhD; Fernando Wehrmeister, PhD; Christina M. Jensen, MSc; Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, MD, PhD, DMSc; James M. Swanson, PhD; Christian Kieling, MD, PhD; Luis Augusto Rohde, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  The requirement of a childhood onset has always been a key criterion for the diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults, but recently this requirement has become surrounded by controversy.

Objective  To investigate whether impaired young adults with ADHD symptoms always have a childhood-onset disorder ...

Editorial: Can ADHD Onset Occur in Adulthood?; Stephen V. Faraone, PhD; Joseph Biederman, MD
Original Investigation 
Jessica C. Agnew-Blais, ScD; Guilherme V. Polanczyk, MD, PhD; Andrea Danese, MD, PhD; Jasmin Wertz, MSc; Terrie E. Moffitt, PhD; Louise Arseneault, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is now recognized to occur in adulthood and is associated with a range of negative outcomes. However, less is known about the prospective course of ADHD into adulthood, the risk factors for its persistence, and the possibility of its emergence in young adulthood ...

Editorial: Can ADHD Onset Occur in Adulthood?; Stephen V. Faraone, PhD; Joseph Biederman, MD
Comment & Response 
Barbara O. Rothbaum, PhD, ABPP

To the Editor Steenkamp1 and Yehuda and Hoge’s2 Viewpoint articles do not take into account the art and the science of evidence-based treatment. Recommendations from the Institute of Medicine report3 include that (1) the Department of Defense/Veterans Administration should measure patients’ progress across treatment and ...

Comment & Response 
Rachel Yehuda, PhD; Charles W. Hoge, MD

In Reply We are all on the same team working to optimize care for service members and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We all understand that clinical practice guidelines support a wide range of evidence-based treatment options, including prolonged exposure (PE) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT), and ...

Comment & Response 
Maria M. Steenkamp, PhD

In Reply The prevailing narrative on psychotherapy for military-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the literature (but perhaps not in clinical practice) is that first-line psychotherapies are highly effective for military-related PTSD. This narrative is increasingly being conveyed as fact to patients, students, clinicians, and the general public....

Comment & Response 
Harold Kudler, MD; Kristine Day, PhD; Paula P. Schnurr, PhD

To the Editor While we agree with many points raised by Steenkamp1 and Yehuda and Hoge,2 their Viewpoint articles published in JAMA Psychiatry inaccurately characterize policy and practice regarding evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

Comment & Response 
Scott C. Fears, MD, PhD; Nelson B. Freimer, MD; Carrie E. Bearden, PhD

To the Editor In the article titled “Multisystem Component Phenotypes of Bipolar Disorder for Genetic Investigations of Extended Pedigrees,”1 published online in JAMA Psychiatry on February 12, 2014, and in the April 2014 issue of the journal, results for the heritability and bipolar I disorder (BP-I) association ...

Correction  FREE

In the article titled “Multisystem Component Phenotypes of Bipolar Disorder for Genetic Investigations of Extended Pedigrees,”1 published online in JAMA Psychiatry on February 12, 2014, and in the April 2014 issue of the journal, 17 of 527 neuroimages had been misidentified. After these data were corrected, the ...

Original Investigation 
Clemens W. Janssen, PhD; Christopher A. Lowry, PhD; Matthias R. Mehl, PhD; John J. B. Allen, PhD; Kimberly L. Kelly, MPA; Danielle E. Gartner, BA; Angelica Medrano, BA; Tommy K. Begay, PhD; Kelly Rentscher, MA; Joshua J. White, BS; Andrew Fridman, BS; Levi J. Roberts, BA; Megan L. Robbins, PhD; Kay-u Hanusch, MSc; Steven P. Cole, PhD; Charles L. Raison, MD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Limitations of current antidepressants highlight the need to identify novel treatments for major depressive disorder. A prior open trial found that a single session of whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) reduced depressive symptoms; however, the lack of a placebo control raises the possibility that the observed antidepressant effects ...

Editorial 
Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD

The genetics and biology underlying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is at an exciting inflection point, with progress being made rapidly in many areas. Stein and colleagues,1 in this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, present the largest effort to date in identifying genetic correlates of PTSD. Their work ...

Original Investigation 
Murray B. Stein, MD, MPH; Chia-Yen Chen, ScD; Robert J. Ursano, MD; Tianxi Cai, ScD; Joel Gelernter, MD; Steven G. Heeringa, PhD; Sonia Jain, PhD; Kevin P. Jensen, PhD; Adam X. Maihofer, MS; Colter Mitchell, PhD; Caroline M. Nievergelt, PhD; Matthew K. Nock, PhD; Benjamin M. Neale, PhD; Renato Polimanti, PhD; Stephan Ripke, MD; Xiaoying Sun, MS; Michael L. Thomas, PhD; Qian Wang, PhD; Erin B. Ware, PhD; Susan Borja, PhD; Ronald C. Kessler, PhD; Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD; for the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (STARRS) Collaborators
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, serious public health concern, particularly in the military. The identification of genetic risk factors for PTSD may provide important insights into the biological foundation of vulnerability and comorbidity.

Objective  To discover genetic loci associated with the lifetime risk ...

Editorial: Environment and Genes in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD
Original Investigation 
Joseph F. Hayes, MSc, MBChB; Alexandra Pitman, PhD; Louise Marston, PhD; Kate Walters, PhD; John R. Geddes, MD; Michael King, PhD; David P. J. Osborn, PhD

Importance  Self-harm is a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with bipolar disorder and is strongly associated with suicide. There is evolving evidence that lithium use may reduce suicidal behavior, in addition to concerns that the use of anticonvulsants may increase self-harm. Information is limited about the ...

Original Investigation 
Elaine H. Morrato, DrPH, MPH; Elizabeth J. Campagna, MS; Sarah E. Brewer, MPA; L. Miriam Dickinson, PhD; Deborah S. K. Thomas, PhD; Benjamin F. Miller, PsyD; James Dearing, PhD; Benjamin G. Druss, MD; Richard C. Lindrooth, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Medicaid quality indicators track diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease screening in adults receiving antipsychotics and/or those with serious mental illness.

Objective  To inform performance improvement interventions by evaluating the relative importance of patient, prescriber, and practice factors affecting metabolic testing.

Design, Setting, and Participants  ...

Editorial 
Daphne J. Holt, MD, PhD

Abnormalities in emotional function are thought to play a central role in many of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it has been unexpectedly difficult to pinpoint the changes in emotional processing that occur in the illness. Despite this, it has become increasingly important to make progress on ...

Editorial 
Christopher C. Abbott, MD, MS; Dyani Loo, MD; Jing Sui, PhD

In this issue of JAMA Psychiatry, Redlich et al1 assess the predictive potential of baseline (before electroconvulsive therapy [ECT]) structural neuroimaging with a set of machine-learning–based approaches. In the pre-ECT evaluation and consent process, the ECT health care professional must balance the anticipated benefits and risks for ...

Original Investigation 
Hengyi Cao, MB, MMedSc; Alessandro Bertolino, MD, PhD; Henrik Walter, MD, PhD; Michael Schneider, MD; Axel Schäfer, PhD; Paolo Taurisano, PhD; Giuseppe Blasi, MD, PhD; Leila Haddad, PhD; Oliver Grimm, MD; Kristina Otto, MSc; Luanna Dixson, BSc; Susanne Erk, MD, PhD; Sebastian Mohnke, MSc; Andreas Heinz, MD, PhD; Nina Romanczuk-Seiferth, PhD; Thomas W. Mühleisen, PhD; Manuel Mattheisen, MD; Stephanie H. Witt, PhD; Sven Cichon, PhD; Markus Noethen, MD, PhD; Marcella Rietschel, MD, PhD; Heike Tost, MD, PhD; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, MD, PhD
Includes: Supplemental Content

Importance  Although deficits in emotional processing are prominent in schizophrenia, it has been difficult to identify neural mechanisms related to the genetic risk for this highly heritable illness. Prior studies have not found consistent regional activation or connectivity alterations in first-degree relatives compared with healthy controls, suggesting ...

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