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  • JAMA Psychiatry July 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Standardized Risk of Suicide Attempt by Mental Health Diagnosis and Deployment Status Among Regular Army Enlisted Soldiers

    The sample of enlisted soldiers (n = 9650 soldiers who attempted suicide and 153 528 control person-months) is a subset of the total sample (n = 193 617 person-months) from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers Historical Administrative Data Study. Any mental health diagnosis includes most International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for mental disorders (eg, major depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, and personality disorders), but excludes postconcussion syndrome and tobacco use disorder when those were the only recorded mental health diagnoses. See eTable 3 in the Supplement for a complete list of included and excluded International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Standardized risk estimates (soldiers who attempted suicide per 100 000 person-years) assume other predictors were at their samplewide means. Estimates were calculated based on logistic regression models that included basic sociodemographic and service-related variables (sex, age at entry into the Army, current age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and time in service) and also included a dummy predictor variable for calendar month and year to control for secular trends.
  • Risk of Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Among Siblings of Probands With Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    JAMA Psychiatry. 2016; 73(6):622-629. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0495

    This population-based case-control cohort study examines the risk for psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders among the full siblings of probands with autism spectrum disorder.

  • The Value of Psychiatric Diagnoses

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    JAMA Psychiatry. 2015; 72(12):1165-1166. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.2250
  • JAMA Psychiatry March 1, 2014

    Figure 3: Incidence Rate Ratios (IRRs) for Personality Disorders, Developmental Disorders, Childhood-Onset Behavioral and Emotional Disorders, and Mental Retardation by Parental Age

    Persons identified were born from January 1, 1955, to December 31, 2006, and followed up from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2011. All IRRs are adjusted for age, sex, and calendar year. Tick marks indicate 95% confidence intervals. A, Specific personality disorders (code F60). B, Pervasive developmental disorders (code F84). C, Behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence (codes F90-F98). D, Mental retardation (codes F70-F79).
  • Personality Disorders and the 3-Year Course of Alcohol, Drug, and Nicotine Use Disorders

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    Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011; 68(11):1158-1167. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.136
  • JAMA Psychiatry August 1, 2011

    Figure: Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychopathology and Function From the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Figure 1. Diagnostic remission (A) and diagnostic relapse (B) of major depressive disorder (MDD), other personality disorders (OPD; either avoidant personality disorder [AVPD] or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder [OCPD]), and borderline personality disorder (BPD). Remission of MDD was based on a Psychiatric Status Rating of less than 2 for 2 consecutive months, and MDD relapse was based on a Psychiatric Status Rating of 5 or 6 for 2 consecutive months. Remission of OPD was defined as either fewer than 2 AVPD criteria for AVPD cases or fewer than 2 OCPD criteria for OCPD cases for 2 or 12 consecutive months, and OPD relapse was defined as returning to more than 4 criteria for 2 months or for either AVPD or OCPD cases separately. Remission of BPD was defined as fewer than 2 criteria for 2 or 12 consecutive months, and BPD relapse was defined as returning to more than 5 criteria for 2 months. Analyses were based on lifetest survival estimates.
  • JAMA Psychiatry August 1, 2011

    Figure: Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychopathology and Function From the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Figure 2. Prevalence of borderline personality disorder criteria. Positive indicates the cases with a score of 2 (definitely present and clinically significant) for each of the 9 borderline personality disorder criteria on the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders, assessed for the 2 years prior to the follow-up point.
  • JAMA Psychiatry August 1, 2011

    Figure: Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychopathology and Function From the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Figure 3. Scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) (A) and the Global Social Adjustment (GSA) scale (B). A, A score of 100 represents the best level of overall functioning, and a score of 0 represents the lowest level. B, A score of 0 represents the highest level of social functioning, and a score of 5 represents the lowest level. MDD indicates major depressive disorder; OPD, other personality disorders; and BPD, borderline personality disorder.
  • JAMA Psychiatry August 1, 2011

    Figure: Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychopathology and Function From the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Figure 4. Functional remission, defined as a Global Assessment of Functioning score greater than 70 sustained for 2 months. Analyses were conducted using lifetest survival estimates. MDD indicates major depressive disorder; OPD, other personality disorders; and BPD, borderline personality disorder.
  • Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychopathology and Function From the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011; 68(8):827-837. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.37
  • JAMA Psychiatry December 1, 2008

    Figure 1: The Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for DSM-IV Personality Disorders: A Multivariate Twin Study

    Genetic parameter estimates from best-fitting model independent pathway model for 10 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) personality disorders (PDs). Path estimates are standardized regression coefficients, so they must be squared to obtain the proportion of variance accounted for in the dependent variable. A represents additive genetic effects. The subscripts C and S represent common factor and disorder-specific effects, respectively. The first, second, and third genetic common factors are indicated by the subscripts C1, C2, and C3. Paths with values of +0.28 or greater (which account for ≥8% of phenotypic variance) are colored with the first, second, and third common factors, indicated by red, green, and blue, respectively; the disorder-specific factors are shown in pink. Paths not exceeding the +0.28 or greater cutoff are depicted in black.
  • JAMA Psychiatry December 1, 2008

    Figure 2: The Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for DSM-IV Personality Disorders: A Multivariate Twin Study

    Environmental parameter estimates from best-fitting model independent pathway model for 10 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) personality disorders (PDs). Path estimates are standardized regression coefficients, so they must be squared to obtain the proportion of variance accounted for in the dependent variable. E represents unique environmental effects. The subscripts C and S represent common factor and disorder-specific effects, respectively. The first, second, and third unique environmental common factors are indicated by the subscripts C1, C2, and C3. Paths with values of +0.28 or greater (which account for ≥8% of phenotypic variance) are colored with the first, second, and third common factors, indicated by red, green, and blue, respectively; the disorder-specific factors are shown in pink. Paths not exceeding the +0.28 or greater cutoff are depicted in black.
  • The Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for DSM-IV Personality Disorders: A Multivariate Twin Study

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008; 65(12):1438-1446. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.65.12.1438
  • JAMA Psychiatry May 1, 2006

    Figure 1Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Association of problematic parental behavior in the home by a mean offspring of age 16 years with risk for any offspring personality disorder (PD) at a mean age of 22 or 33 years.
  • JAMA Psychiatry May 1, 2006

    Figure 2Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Association of problematic parenting behavior in the home by a mean offspring age of 16 years with risk for specific types of offspring personality disorders (PDs) at a mean age of 22 or 33 years. The composite index of problematic parental behavior was significantly associated with risk for offspring antisocial (P = .003), avoidant (P = .005), borderline (P<.001), depressive (P = .002), histrionic (P = .02), paranoid (P<.001), and schizotypal (P<.001) PDs at a mean offspring age of 22 or 33 years.
  • JAMA Psychiatry May 1, 2006

    Figure 3Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Association of aversive parenting behavior evident by a mean offspring age of 16 years with risk for specific offspring personality disorders (PDs) at a mean age of 22 or 33 years. The composite index of aversive parental behaviors was significantly associated with risk for offspring borderline (P = .001), paranoid (P = .004), passive-aggressive (P = .046), and schizotypal (P = .02) PDs at a mean offspring age of 22 or 33 years.
  • JAMA Psychiatry May 1, 2006

    Figure 4Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Association of low parental affection or nurturing evident by a mean offspring age of 16 years with risk for specific offspring personality disorders (PDs) at a mean age of 22 or 33 years. The composite index of low parental affection or nurturing was significantly associated with risk for offspring antisocial (P = .003), avoidant (P = .01), borderline (P = .002), depressive (P = .02), paranoid (P = .002), schizoid (P = .046), and schizotypal (P<.001) PDs at a mean offspring age of 22 or 33 years.
  • JAMA Psychiatry May 1, 2006

    Figure 5Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Association of offspring behavioral or emotional problems during childhood, parental psychiatric disorders, and problematic parental behavior in the home by a mean age of 16 years with risk for offspring personality disorder at a mean age of 22 or 33 years. The covariates were age, sex, parental psychiatric disorders evident by a mean offspring age of 16 years, and the presence of 1 or more offspring behavioral or emotional problems at a mean offspring age of 6 years. AOR indicates adjusted odds ratio; rp, partial correlation coefficient. *P<.05.
  • Parenting Behaviors Associated With Risk for Offspring Personality Disorder During Adulthood

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006; 63(5):579-587. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.63.5.579
  • JAMA Psychiatry October 1, 2004

    Figure 1: Individual Growth Curve Analysis Illuminates Stability and Change inPersonality Disorder Features: The Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders

    Ordinary least squares individualgrowth trajectories for total personality disorder (PD) features in 250 subjectsduring the study period. Time is reported in years since the beginning ofthe study and centered for each subject using the subject’s age at entryinto the study.